Articles

Queen’s speech promises change on mental health but ignores wider NHS problems

BMJ Recent Articles - 4 hours 58 min ago
Mental healthcare services in England will be the only part of NHS care to be changed by new legislation as part of the government’s plans for the next two years, announced in the Queen’s speech on...
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Fall in rate of stillbirth drives down perinatal mortality

BMJ Recent Articles - 5 hours 18 min ago
The rate of perinatal deaths in the UK has declined over two years, largely driven by a drop in rates of stillbirth, according to new figures.1The report, conducted by the National Perinatal...
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Authors’ reply to Dib

BMJ Recent Articles - 5 hours 58 min ago
Pre-endoscopy scoring systems do not take into account whether bleeding is from varices because that is unknown before endoscopy. Several risk scoring systems, however, such as the Glasgow Blatchford...
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Utility of AIMS65 score in predicting mortality in patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

BMJ Recent Articles - 6 hours 58 min ago
Early risk stratification in patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding is used to facilitate accurate triage and assist in decision making such as the timing of endoscopy and...
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Caution with tissue adhesives for peri-ocular lacerations

BMJ Recent Articles - 7 hours 8 min ago
A 3 year old boy sustained a small laceration and bruising to his right brow. He was seen by his general practitioner, who used cyanoacrylate glue for wound closure. Unfortunately, the glue also...
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Seven days in medicine: 14-20 June 2017

BMJ Recent Articles - 12 hours 17 min ago
BrexitNew alliance will champion health in negotiationsThe newly formed Brexit Health Alliance will highlight healthcare research, access to technologies, and patient treatment in Brexit...
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Family history is strong risk factor in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, study finds

BMJ Recent Articles - 15 hours 8 min ago
The risk of developing breast cancer in women who carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations increases with the number of relatives who have a breast cancer diagnosis, a large prospective cohort study published...
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Combination of diet, exercise, and behaviour change may help weight loss in child obesity

BMJ Recent Articles - 15 hours 9 min ago
Interventions combining diet with physical activity and behavioural change can have a small, short term effect in reducing weight among children and adolescents who are overweight or obese, report...
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Limited awareness of animal influenza prevention and control among Dai Lue smallholder farmers in Southwest China.

Latest Pubmed articles about Swine flu - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 05:00
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Limited awareness of animal influenza prevention and control among Dai Lue smallholder farmers in Southwest China.

Trop Anim Health Prod. 2017 Jun 17;:

Authors: Zhao X, Davey G

Abstract
Awareness of animal influenza and its prevention and control is important for ensuring livestock health, production and welfare. In China, a country stereotyped as a major source of emerging zoonotic infectious diseases, research on the public understanding of animal influenza is limited to the Han, the main ethnic group. The present qualitative study in Southwest China investigated awareness of animal influenza among the Dai, an ethnic minority. The participants (15 men and 10 women, ages 18-83) were smallholder farmers of pigs and poultry in rural areas of Jinghong, Xishuangbanna, Yunnan Province. A mixture of interviews and group discussions took place in homes and villages. The participants were asked about their knowledge of avian influenza (H7N9), swine influenza (H1N1), precautions taken to protect against influenza, procedures when animals were sick and perceived risk of animal influenza. The data were analysed following coding and thematic analysis. The findings demonstrated a limited understanding of animal health and welfare among participants. Specifically, they were largely unaware of animal influenza (H7N9, H1N1) including its causes, symptoms, prevention and treatment. The farmers were also uninformed of the risks they faced and unknowingly engaged in behaviours which increased direct or indirect exposure to infected animals, a risk factor for human infection. They also reported poor usage of veterinary services. In order to guarantee the health, welfare and production of their livestock, immediate action is needed to enable Dai smallholder farmers to prevent and respond to animal influenza effectively and timely.

PMID: 28624926 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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PA-X protein decreases replication and pathogenicity of swine influenza virus in cultured cells and mouse models.

Latest Pubmed articles about Swine flu - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 05:00
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PA-X protein decreases replication and pathogenicity of swine influenza virus in cultured cells and mouse models.

Vet Microbiol. 2017 Jun;205:66-70

Authors: Gong XQ, Sun YF, Ruan BY, Liu XM, Wang Q, Yang HM, Wang SY, Zhang P, Wang XH, Shan TL, Tong W, Zhou YJ, Li GX, Zheng H, Tong GZ, Yu H

Abstract
Swine influenza viruses have been circulating in pigs throughout world and might be potential threats to human health. PA-X protein is a newly discovered protein produced from the PA gene by ribosomal frameshifting and the effects of PA-X on the 1918 H1N1, the pandemic 2009 H1N1, the highly pathogenic avian H5N1 and the avian H9N2 influenza viruses have been reported. However, the role of PA-X in the pathogenesis of swine influenza virus is still unknown. In this study, we rescued the H1N1 wild-type (WT) classical swine influenza virus (A/Swine/Guangdong/1/2011 (H1N1)) and H1N1 PA-X deficient virus containing mutations at the frameshift motif, and compared their replication properties and pathogenicity of swine influenza virus in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that the expression of PA-X inhibits virus replication and polymerase activity in cultured cells and decreases virulence in mouse models. Therefore, our study demonstrates that PA-X protein acts as a negative virulence regulator for classical H1N1 swine influenza virus and decreases virulence by inhibiting viral replication and polymerase activity, deepening our understanding of the pathogenesis of swine influenza virus.

PMID: 28622865 [PubMed - in process]

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Inhibition of Avian Influenza A Virus Replication in Human Cells by Host Restriction Factor TUFM Is Correlated with Autophagy.

Latest Pubmed articles about Swine flu - Tue, 06/20/2017 - 05:00
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Inhibition of Avian Influenza A Virus Replication in Human Cells by Host Restriction Factor TUFM Is Correlated with Autophagy.

MBio. 2017 Jun 13;8(3):

Authors: Kuo SM, Chen CJ, Chang SC, Liu TJ, Chen YH, Huang SY, Shih SR

Abstract
Avian influenza A viruses generally do not replicate efficiently in human cells, but substitution of glutamic acid (Glu, E) for lysine (Lys, K) at residue 627 of avian influenza virus polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2) can serve to overcome host restriction and facilitate human infectivity. Although PB2 residue 627 is regarded as a species-specific signature of influenza A viruses, host restriction factors associated with PB2627E have yet to be fully investigated. We conducted immunoprecipitation, followed by differential proteomic analysis, to identify proteins associating with PB2627K (human signature) and PB2627E (avian signature) of influenza A/WSN/1933(H1N1) virus, and the results indicated that Tu elongation factor, mitochondrial (TUFM), had a higher binding affinity for PB2627E than PB2627K in transfected human cells. Stronger binding of TUFM to avian-signature PB2590G/591Q and PB2627E in the 2009 swine-origin pandemic H1N1 and 2013 avian-origin H7N9 influenza A viruses was similarly observed. Viruses carrying avian-signature PB2627E demonstrated increased replication in TUFM-deficient cells, but viral replication decreased in cells overexpressing TUFM. Interestingly, the presence of TUFM specifically inhibited the replication of PB2627E viruses, but not PB2627K viruses. In addition, enhanced levels of interaction between TUFM and PB2627E were noted in the mitochondrial fraction of infected cells. Furthermore, TUFM-dependent autophagy was reduced in TUFM-deficient cells infected with PB2627E virus; however, autophagy remained consistent in PB2627K virus-infected cells. The results suggest that TUFM acts as a host restriction factor that impedes avian-signature influenza A virus replication in human cells in a manner that correlates with autophagy.IMPORTANCE An understanding of the mechanisms that influenza A viruses utilize to shift host tropism and the identification of host restriction factors that can limit infection are both critical to the prevention and control of emerging viruses that cross species barriers to target new hosts. Using a proteomic approach, we revealed a novel role for TUFM as a host restriction factor that exerts an inhibitory effect on avian-signature PB2627E influenza virus propagation in human cells. We further found that increased TUFM-dependent autophagy correlates with the inhibitory effect on avian-signature influenza virus replication and may serve as a key intrinsic mechanism to restrict avian influenza virus infection in humans. These findings provide new insight regarding the TUFM mitochondrial protein and may have important implications for the development of novel antiviral strategies.

PMID: 28611246 [PubMed - in process]

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